Books Reading

Books Reading

Happy New Year and Gettin’ Cozy!

Start the new year positive. That’s what everyone says.  And it is a good thought, a great idea. Begin with a new slate.  It was challenging to do that this year while sitting on the couch battling a bad virus of drippy nose, post nasal drip and sinuses in such pain all I could do was squeeze my head.  Most Christmas holidays I end up getting a cold. Body exhausted from holiday prep and work. I think most people are worn down. It’s a busy time of year for me, with holiday craft and maker markets and custom orders, daily life unravels quickly.  Secret Santa for my daughters class, Secret Santa for my family which means I also have to do not only my secret Santa but my daughters.  I used to enjoy Christmas, so much that my sister nicknamed me Tracey Christmas.  The songs, the decorations, the nutcracker, the smell of Christmas trees, making a wreath.  I loved and still do love it all.  Now life gets too busy where we can’t enjoy life.  What can be done differently in 2019?  I don’t do resolutions but it is a nice time to reflect, recharge and reacess.

Which leads me to clean up time, clutter clearing and destashing. Maria Kondo is the latest craze. I bought her book two years ago.  I read some of it. And now she has a Netflix series.  My husband and I watched episode one. His closet now looks like he is leaving me. He is very good and getting rid of unnecessary things. And apparently he’s not the only one. According to the news, people are clearing out so much that charities are overloaded.  That’s always a problem in Brooklyn.  We have so much that charities want new with tags or refuse your items. How can we get rid of stuff, and keep a clear area. Lessen our footprint.

So what’s my point? What is my point. Carbon footprints. I really don’t want to show you my messy, overcrowded studio.   If I do will it make me more accountable? Maybe. But I do need to get rid of stuff, fabrics. We all do. Our local weekly farmer’s market has a regular vendor who will take your unwanted fabrics and recycle them. Another book I read recently that I really enjoyed and was relatable to me is American Cozy by Stephanie Pedersen.

AMERICAN COZY


This is based on the other latest craze hygge. Although it is hygge inspired and is an inspiration read for us American who are clutter bugs. I don’t want bugs in my studio and when there is so much crap everywhere I feel like I may uncover some critter every time I move a large container of fabric. So I am getting rid of stuff, I just need to. For my own sanity.

So 2019 what are you going to be? Lessen my footprint. Make an effort to do so.

Do you have any decluttering, how to deal with the emotions of throwing out fabric?

Tracey

Inspirations, Books Reading

Currently Reading - Feed Sacks - The Colorful History

my copy of Feed Sacks with a feed sack used as wrapping. 

my copy of Feed Sacks with a feed sack used as wrapping. 

Currently reading a book called Feed Sacks, The Colorful History of a Frugal Fabric.  I have always been interested in feed sacks.  They were a fabric bag made for sugar or flour or other grains and then repurposed most of the time for a dress or clothes.  Both of my parents were born during the depression.  They do not talk much about it although I am very interested.   Things were not wasted.  Food and clothing were not plentiful.  A very different life from mine and my daughter's.  

Feed Sacks is written by Linzee Kull McCray and published by UpperCase.  It is over 530 pages of photos and stories and 850 feed sack patterns are included.  It comes wrapped in a feed sack print. I ordered 2 and each came with a different fabric.  Talk about a great gift! 

Feed sacks are known by other names; cotton commodity bags, chicken linens, grain bags or textile bags. Since most of the people sewing were women, the manufacturers started to create their feed sacks with the woman of the house in mind. Sewing patterns were printed on the sacks, floral designs or needlework doilies. 

Once the sewing machine was invented, specifically a lock stitch, bags were able to be easily made and replaced the barrels that were originally used for carrying products.  Feed Sack takes the reader from the mid 1850's up to the early 1960's when sack fabric production ceased.

Linzee covers a thorough history of the feed sack.  How to tell if something is a feed sack, different feed sack sizes, feed sacks around the world and the many purposes that the feed sack served from clothes to quilts to kitchen purposes and sewing contests. 

a doll pattern to be cut out and made into a stuffed toy. all photos from the book Feed Sack by Linzee Kull McCray

a doll pattern to be cut out and made into a stuffed toy. all photos from the book Feed Sack by Linzee Kull McCray

all photos from the book Feed Sack by Linzee Kull McCray

all photos from the book Feed Sack by Linzee Kull McCray

a girl on the farm 1938.  all photos from the book Feed Sack by Linzee Kull McCray

a girl on the farm 1938.  all photos from the book Feed Sack by Linzee Kull McCray

feed sack example  all photos from the book Feed Sack by Linzee Kull McCray

feed sack example  all photos from the book Feed Sack by Linzee Kull McCray

all photos from the book Feed Sack by Linzee Kull McCray

Almost a century later these designs and prints are still popular.  

Click here for more info on Feed Sacks, The Colorful History of a Frugal Fabric. 

Tracey